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Theresia Raich

Foto donna


1919-2018
Prisoner in the Bolzano Lager.

Artist
Linda De Zen

Place
Petrarca park, Bozen

Bio



Theresia was imprisoned in the Via Resia Concentration and Transit Camp in Bolzano from September 1944 until the end of April 1945. Two of her brothers had defected from the Wehrmacht, therefore, Theresia and her father were taken in their place under the Sippenhaft, which prescribed the imprisonment of the wanted person's family members. Father and daughter spent more than seven months in the Bolzano lager. Hunger, cold, sickness, abuse, the constant fear of being sent to an extermination camp and seeing prisoners tormented to death marked Theresia for the rest of her life. After the war, Theresia married Albert Graf of Rabenstein. Together they had nine children: five boys and four girls. In 1956, Theresia's husband fell seriously ill and the entire burden of the family's survival fell on her shoulders. Despite the struggle, Theresia always valued having a home that was open to everyone: no one should have ever got up from their table still hungry or thirsty. She had known hunger and thirst and wanted to spare others this experience. Theresia lived to the age of 96 in the Joggelehof in Stuls, enjoying each of her 23 grandchildren. She spent the last years of her life, until her death on 2 October 2018, in the St. Leonhard retirement home.




Theresia was born on 23 June 1919 in St Leonhard in the Passeier Valley. At the end of June 1944, Theresia's brothers Anton (*1925) and Franz (*1926) deserted during their training in the barracks in Silandro, hiding in the woods. Under the Sippenhaft, which prescribed the imprisonment of a wanted person’s family members, Theresia and her father Josef (*1885) were arrested on September 21, 1944, and were deported together with 35 other people from the Passeiertal Valley to the concentration and transit camp in Bolzano. The family farm was entrusted by the Nazi authorities to a neighbour. Theresia and her father spent more than seven months in the Bolzano Lager. They were immediately separated: Theresia entered the women's block. At first, Theresia with other women was sent to work in the barracks in Gries, where they worked washing uniforms. After about a month, Theresia was transferred for a few weeks to the outer camp at Colle Isarco, where the prisoners were assigned to cleaning and cooking. There, many were victims of sexual violence and assault by SS men. The food was also scarcer and worse than in the Bolzano lager. Hunger, cold, sickness, violence, the fear of being transported to an extermination camp and seeing prisoners tormented to death - all this marked Theresia for the rest of her life. On April 30, 1945, Theresia was released and the Bolzano camp was abandoned. In 1946 Theresia married Albert Graf from Rabenstein. Together they had nine children: five boys and four girls. At the 1939 “Option”, the family decided to keep their Italian citizenship, thus attracting the hatred of many local National Socialists. In 1956, Theresia's husband fell seriously ill. He remained in the hospital for a long time and was then unable to work. The burden of survival for the whole family fell on Theresia's shoulders, who sewed and washed clothes for relatives. She often worked late into the night. Despite the struggle, Theresia always valued having an open house: many people found shelter in her home for a short or long time. Throughout her life, Theresia adhered to a principle: no one should have ever left her table hungry or thirsty. In 1999, in two months, her husband and third child died. Theresia hardly recovered from these events; her faith helped her. Theresia lived until the age of 96 in the Joggelehof in Stuls, joyfully enjoying her 23 grandchildren. She spent the last years of her life, until her death on October 2, 2018, in the St. Leonhard retirement home.

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Linda De Zen
Si laurea in spettacolo al DAMS di Padova.
Il suo interesse per l’arte si sviluppa anche praticamente: inizia a studiare da autodidatta diverse tecniche, la fotografia analogica, il mosaico e infine la pittura. Il suo processo pittorico si sviluppa nei ritratti a occhi chiusi, opere in cui l’artista rifiuta l’osservazione del medium e si concentra sul soggetto che ha di fronte trasformando la sua percezione visiva nel tratto. Nel 2017 arriva a Roma per proseguire la sua ricerca e sviluppa i suoi lavori in una residenza d’artista presso la galleria Sala Blu che ospita la sua prima mostra personale. Successivamente espone al Museo Scalvini di Desio (MB), nell’Abbazia di Badia a Ruoti (AR), nelle sale di Palazzo Risolo a Specchia (LE), a Trieste presso Knulp e in occasione del Tact&Art 2019, nel 2020 ritorna in mostra a Roma da Up Urban Prospective Factory e nel mese di agosto è ospitata dal comune di Bienno (BR) in un progetto espositivo personale nelle sale affrescate della biblioteca. Il suo lavoro pittorico si affianca a quello illustrativo: nel 2020 realizza il libro MeTe, un lavoro editoriale a quattro mani con Massimo Viglietti pubblicato da Neomediaitalia (NA) nel novembre 2021, nello stesso anno le sue illustrazioni sul volume Una stanza tutta per sé, curato da Rossana Calbi per Edizioni del Frisco (PI), nel 2022 pubblica il libro d’artista Mitomani per Beauroma Books (RM) presentato in mostra da Uroboro Bookshop di Roma per la rassegna Zone a Tema Lib(e)ro. A maggio 2023 ha presentato la mostra personale Conviene far bene l’amore a cura di Rossana Calbi al Germi di Milano.
Per contattarla: telemailsito

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